Research Archives - Rivers of Carbon

  • Wetlands five times more efficient at reducing nitrate than the best land-based conservation practices….

    We came across this interesting article that adds further weight to the value of wetlands in our agricultural and urban environments… The agricultural regions of the U.S. Midwest have a problem with excess nitrate from crop fertiliser making its way into rivers and streams through subsurface drainage channels and agricultural ditches.  High nitrate concentrations in waterways are harmful […]

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  • Stone Age to ‘drone age’: using technology for reforestation

    A team of scientists are fighting climate change by dragging reforestation technology from the Stone Age to the ‘drone age’. In November last year, scientists in Thailand sent a drone on a test mission – not to target an enemy hiding in the forest below, but to bring new life to woodlands by “bombing” them with […]

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  • Rethinking our fencing focus – small streams crucially important

    New Zealand scientists are calling for a change to the current waterway fencing requirements that only require streams wider than 1 metre and deeper than 30cm to be fenced  to exclude stock. Research by Dr Richard McDowell published in the International Journal of Environmental Quality has found that smaller, exempt streams actually account for the majority […]

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  • Five Things About Long-Term Monitoring

    Professor David Lindenmayer wrote this excellent article for  the latest edition of ‘Decision Point’, thank you to David Salt, editor of Decision Point for allowing us to share it here. Effective long-term environmental monitoring is difficult and challenging; it requires good design, careful review, long-term commitment, and often gets overlooked when resources are handed out […]

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  • A need for clear communication – exploring the links between extreme weather and climate change

    What are the connections to human-caused climate change? And how can we best communicate what the most recent science is telling us about human-induced and natural changes to weather and climate? There is still widespread confusion about the linkages between human-induced climate change and extreme weather, not only among the public, but also among some […]

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  • Spot the scientist! Veg surveys underway in the Murray-Darling Basin in challenging conditions

    Surveys have commenced across the Murray-Darling Basin for the Vegetation Theme in the Murray-Darling Basin Environmental Water Knowledge and Research project  (MDB EWKR). A variety of wetland and floodplain habitats are being surveyed over autumn, including woodlands, shrublands and wetlands. Wetland and floodplain plants are critical components of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, supplying energy […]

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  • Why speak? Scientists as sifters and sorters

    In an information free-for-all why should scientists bother to add their voice? Emma Johnston argues that there is an increasingly important role for scientists amongst the growing ranks of public intellectuals. She explains that scientists must be sifters and sorters to identify what is valuable, sift out deliberately distracting stories and counter fake news. The […]

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  • Cows relaxing in the river leads to more poo….

    Temperature driven pooing: In a paper entitled ‘Temperature-driven river utilisation and preferential defecation by cattle in an English chalk stream‘  by Trevor Alan Bond, David Sear and Mary Edwards, the finding is shared that cattle standing in water ‘pooed’ five times more that the average defacation frequency.  I suspect given how hot it gets here in […]

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  • Buffering the bumps – the benefits of riparian zones in floods

    Water is not the enemy, it is water velocity (speed) that causes the damage.  Australian rivers are meant to be rough and bumpy and riparian vegetation can provide protection from flood impacts along with individual and cumulative benefits to landholders up and down stream.  Healthy, intact riparian zones are great for fish, and often the task […]

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  • Are algal blooms the new norm for Australia’s major rivers?

    Are toxic algal blooms the new norm for Australian rivers? Are we really ready for them to be recurrent on the Murray River? More importantly, what do these frequent blooms say about how we manage water in Australia, especially as we start to see the impacts of climate change on our environment? For much of […]

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