Research Archives - Rivers of Carbon

  • Spot the scientist! Veg surveys underway in the Murray-Darling Basin in challenging conditions

    Surveys have commenced across the Murray-Darling Basin for the Vegetation Theme in the Murray-Darling Basin Environmental Water Knowledge and Research project  (MDB EWKR). A variety of wetland and floodplain habitats are being surveyed over autumn, including woodlands, shrublands and wetlands. Wetland and floodplain plants are critical components of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, supplying energy […]

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  • Why speak? Scientists as sifters and sorters

    In an information free-for-all why should scientists bother to add their voice? Emma Johnston argues that there is an increasingly important role for scientists amongst the growing ranks of public intellectuals. She explains that scientists must be sifters and sorters to identify what is valuable, sift out deliberately distracting stories and counter fake news. The […]

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  • Cows relaxing in the river leads to more poo….

    Temperature driven pooing: In a paper entitled ‘Temperature-driven river utilisation and preferential defecation by cattle in an English chalk stream‘  by Trevor Alan Bond, David Sear and Mary Edwards, the finding is shared that cattle standing in water ‘pooed’ five times more that the average defacation frequency.  I suspect given how hot it gets here in […]

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  • Buffering the bumps – the benefits of riparian zones in floods

    Water is not the enemy, it is water velocity (speed) that causes the damage.  Australian rivers are meant to be rough and bumpy and riparian vegetation can provide protection from flood impacts along with individual and cumulative benefits to landholders up and down stream.  Healthy, intact riparian zones are great for fish, and often the task […]

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  • Are algal blooms the new norm for Australia’s major rivers?

    Are toxic algal blooms the new norm for Australian rivers? Are we really ready for them to be recurrent on the Murray River? More importantly, what do these frequent blooms say about how we manage water in Australia, especially as we start to see the impacts of climate change on our environment? For much of […]

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  • Farming carbon as our future crop?

    We recently read this thought provoking article in The Conversation about how storing carbon could become part of a viable and productive farming system, we thought you might enjoy it too so have summarised the key points: Currently, there are several competing forces putting pressure on Australian agricultural land. A growing global population is placing […]

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  • We hear a lot about carp, but what about redfin?

    We hear a lot about carp, but what about redfin, and the impact that it is having on our native species? In the past week we came across a new study on juvenile Redfin diet that ties in nicely with our latest story on stopping alien fish in their tracks with tons of rock! Redfin […]

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  • Riparian zones are ‘fuses’ for fire – facts and myths about bushfires and climate change

    One of the concerns landholders have when we talk to them about restoring their riparian areas is that the vegetation along the river will act as a ‘fuse’ for fire.  This has become a more common concern over the last few years when we have witnessed (and some communities have tragically experienced) some terrifying fires […]

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  • What is the best way to protect us from climate change? Save our ecosystems.

    When we think about climate change, we often think about building new infrastructure to keep the sea from lapping at our doors, or engineering new ways of moving water through drying landscapes, but in an insightful article James Watson and Tara Martin point out that if we look after our planet’s ecosystems they will look […]

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  • Which is better for the environment; one large tree or ten small ones?

    The Rivers of Carbon approach is one where we seek to protect first and restore second, as we know that intact remnant vegetation is more diverse and productive than new plantings which take time to grow and develop.   A recent journal article published in Biological Conservation in November 2015 entitled ‘Single large or several […]

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