Boosting Biodiversity Archives - Rivers of Carbon

  • What? We have three different types of ibis in Australia?

    In the past 30 years, there have been significant declines in populations of all of our waterbirds, including the Australian ibis species. Australian scientists are hard at work studying these groups and attempting to identify the cause of the declining numbers in certain habitats. In the case of ibis, causes are thought to include reductions […]

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  • Touching wood

    Britt Gregory describes the hands-on work be ing done by the local community to Protect, Link and Enhance Remnants of Kyneton’s Grassy Woodlands. Granite outcrops emerge from the vast, windswept rolling hills. Scattered majestic gums tower overhead, and at times are twisted and gnarled, shaped by the years. Wattles, shrubs and saplings grow among a lush […]

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  • Spot the scientist! Veg surveys underway in the Murray-Darling Basin in challenging conditions

    Surveys have commenced across the Murray-Darling Basin for the Vegetation Theme in the Murray-Darling Basin Environmental Water Knowledge and Research project  (MDB EWKR). A variety of wetland and floodplain habitats are being surveyed over autumn, including woodlands, shrublands and wetlands. Wetland and floodplain plants are critical components of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, supplying energy […]

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  • The case of the missing Ibis, a satellite tracker and some butcherbirds…..

    Heather McGinness who spoke recently at our Breadalbane Biodiversity Forum shared this great story with us about the case of the missing Ibis, a satellite tracker and some cheeky butcher birds… As part of our Environmental Water Knowledge and Research waterbird project we are satellite tracking Straw-necked Ibis to see where they roost, breed, feed […]

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  • We hear a lot about carp, but what about redfin?

    We hear a lot about carp, but what about redfin, and the impact that it is having on our native species? In the past week we came across a new study on juvenile Redfin diet that ties in nicely with our latest story on stopping alien fish in their tracks with tons of rock! Redfin […]

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  • Which is better for the environment; one large tree or ten small ones?

    The Rivers of Carbon approach is one where we seek to protect first and restore second, as we know that intact remnant vegetation is more diverse and productive than new plantings which take time to grow and develop.   A recent journal article published in Biological Conservation in November 2015 entitled ‘Single large or several […]

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  • The Feather Map of Australia

    Australia’s wetlands operate on a boom and bust cycle, when they flood they can attract thousands of waterbirds, when they dry, the birds disappear, only to return with the next flood. The Feather Map of Australia project aims to work out where the birds come from and where they go after the flood. The Feather […]

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  • X-ray seed vision

    This seed x-ray isn’t just beautiful. It’s also a very useful part of the landscape restoration process. Dave Collins and Anne Smith explain why. Over the past four years we’ve been using an x-ray machine to take a closer look at the seeds we collect from wild populations and our own seed production areas in WA’s […]

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  • Upgrading Casuarina Sands fishway so it is still effective in low flows

    Barriers to fish passage such as dams, weirs and road crossings are a key threatening process to native freshwater fish. Fish need to move for many reasons including to breed, maintain population diversity, access refuge areas during drought and to re-establish following disturbances. The ACT has a number of barriers to fish passage and four of them have […]

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  • Superb Parrot Community Based Monitoring

    From many years of community engagement activities in the South West Slopes, it is very apparent that many people, particularly landholders, love the superb parrot (Polytelis swainsonii), and have a strong desire to help in the recovery effort and to learn more about the species. The superb parrot is a spectacular green bird that is easy to […]

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