Biodiversity Archives - Page 2 of 3 - Rivers of Carbon

  • Carping at Christmas – A Community Conversation

    We are delighted to invite you to this fabulous event, which is part of the Rivers of Carbon – Southern Biodiversity Linkages Project. Date: Friday 9 December 2016 Time: 4.30-6.30pm (3.30pm how to fillet and cook carp, 4.30-6.30pm speakers, 6.30-7.15pm refreshments) Venue: Hall Pavilion, Hall Showgrounds, ACT Did you know that carp is the most […]

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  • Help to save the yellow-spotted bell frog!

    South East Local Land Services has $125,000 of NSW Office of Environment and Heritage Saving Our Species funding, available over five years, to assist land managers to undertake project works that protect and enhance yellow-spotted bell frog habitat. Senior Land Services Officer Annelies McGaw said this inconspicuous frog is one of the most endangered vertebrates […]

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  • Rivers of Hope – crayfish lead the campaign for healthy waterways

    ANU biologists are helping crayfish lead the campaign for fresher waterways along the west of Canberra.  Biologist Dr Chris Fulton and Masters student Mae Noble have spent time snorkelling in the Goobarragandra River, in the high country west of Canberra, hoping to catch a glimpse of the Murray Crayfish. Six years ago, this was an […]

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  • Are algal blooms the new norm for Australia’s major rivers?

    Are toxic algal blooms the new norm for Australian rivers? Are we really ready for them to be recurrent on the Murray River? More importantly, what do these frequent blooms say about how we manage water in Australia, especially as we start to see the impacts of climate change on our environment? For much of […]

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  • How can we manage habitat fragmentation better?

    Human altered landscapes are having a big influence on animals. As our populations grow and develop, we expand, changing habitats to the detriment of some species. In a recent article entitled How often, how far, how risky and how biased? researchers from the University of Queensland discuss some important factors to consider in the development […]

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  • What is the best way to protect us from climate change? Save our ecosystems.

    When we think about climate change, we often think about building new infrastructure to keep the sea from lapping at our doors, or engineering new ways of moving water through drying landscapes, but in an insightful article James Watson and Tara Martin point out that if we look after our planet’s ecosystems they will look […]

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  • Which is better for the environment; one large tree or ten small ones?

    The Rivers of Carbon approach is one where we seek to protect first and restore second, as we know that intact remnant vegetation is more diverse and productive than new plantings which take time to grow and develop.   A recent journal article published in Biological Conservation in November 2015 entitled ‘Single large or several […]

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  • Climate extremes impact fruit and nectar production… with consequences for the birds and mammals that depend on them

    The impacts of climate change on species are well-recognised and, in many cases, already happening. These impacts include shifts in species’ distributions and changes in productivity. These changes in productivity can be driven by longer growing seasons in mid to high latitudes, in response to increasing temperatures. Climate change however, is more than a shift […]

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  • Bee informed: Quick pollination facts about our most important pollinators

    Great article from Corey Bradshaw’s excellent blog ‘Conservation Bytes’ If bees were to disappear, humans will disappear within a few years. Albert Einstein I find it interesting that so much is said about bees (including here on this blog), yet many of the ‘facts’ that one hears mentioned in any variety of news sources, public […]

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  • The Feather Map of Australia

    Australia’s wetlands operate on a boom and bust cycle, when they flood they can attract thousands of waterbirds, when they dry, the birds disappear, only to return with the next flood. The Feather Map of Australia project aims to work out where the birds come from and where they go after the flood. The Feather […]

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