Blog

  • Rivers of Carbon Community Conversation – Bidgee Bed, Banks and Maccas

    The Upper Murrumbidgee River has stunning gorges, waterfalls and stretches of river, as well as being home to some special fish. Through our Rivers of Carbon Upper Murrumbidgee River Rehabilitation project we have been connecting the Bredbo and Colinton Gorges by working with landholders in the Bumbalong Valley to fence, weed, stabilise riverbanks and revegetate […]

    Read More
  • Collector Pumpkin Festival – a great day out

    Mary and I had a lovely day at the Collector Pumpkin Festival, speaking with locals and enjoying the gorgeous sunshine.  We thought you might enjoy looking at the world through ‘pumpkin coloured glasses’.  The photo above is of our ‘Scary Crow’ entry of ‘Raving River Girl’ – thanks to Gigi and Heidi for helping me […]

    Read More
  • Communicating climate change: Focus on the framing, not just the facts

    This post is written by the impressive  Rose Hendricks  and taken directly from The Conversation appearing on the 6th of March we happens to be my birthday!  We have reproduced it here as we feel it encapsulates so much of what we try to do in Rivers of Carbon by making science accessible, relevant and meaningful to […]

    Read More
  • Spot the scientist! Veg surveys underway in the Murray-Darling Basin in challenging conditions

    Surveys have commenced across the Murray-Darling Basin for the Vegetation Theme in the Murray-Darling Basin Environmental Water Knowledge and Research project  (MDB EWKR). A variety of wetland and floodplain habitats are being surveyed over autumn, including woodlands, shrublands and wetlands. Wetland and floodplain plants are critical components of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, supplying energy […]

    Read More
  • Are people willing to pay for the co-benefits of carbon farming like biodiversity, vegetation and wellbeing? Find out…

    Adopting carbon farming practices can lead to a loss in profit for farmers. So, is the public willing to pay for the co-benefits of carbon farming? Researchers from the University of Western Australia have estimated the public’s ‘willingness-to-pay’ for carbon farming, and the results of this work have implications for carbon-farming policies. Carbon-farming benefits Agricultural […]

    Read More
  • Why speak? Scientists as sifters and sorters

    In an information free-for-all why should scientists bother to add their voice? Emma Johnston argues that there is an increasingly important role for scientists amongst the growing ranks of public intellectuals. She explains that scientists must be sifters and sorters to identify what is valuable, sift out deliberately distracting stories and counter fake news. The […]

    Read More
  • RoC Community Conversation: Why do you want to mess it up and slow it down – Part Two

    Following such a great response to our ‘Mess it up and slow it down’ workshop in Goulburn last October, we are delighted that Margie Fitzpatrick has invited the Rivers of Carbon community to her beautiful property ‘Australind’, to see the range of ways she has ‘messed it up and slowed water down’. Along with Margie, […]

    Read More
  • Cows relaxing in the river leads to more poo….

    Temperature driven pooing: In a paper entitled ‘Temperature-driven river utilisation and preferential defecation by cattle in an English chalk stream‘  by Trevor Alan Bond, David Sear and Mary Edwards, the finding is shared that cattle standing in water ‘pooed’ five times more that the average defacation frequency.  I suspect given how hot it gets here in […]

    Read More
  • The case of the missing Ibis, a satellite tracker and some butcherbirds…..

    Heather McGinness who spoke recently at our Breadalbane Biodiversity Forum shared this great story with us about the case of the missing Ibis, a satellite tracker and some cheeky butcher birds… As part of our Environmental Water Knowledge and Research waterbird project we are satellite tracking Straw-necked Ibis to see where they roost, breed, feed […]

    Read More
  • What do farmers think about planting riparian margins?

    Fleur Maseyk and her team from the University of Queensland surveyed a group of  dairy farmers working on the Taranaki ring plain in New Zealand to learn more about their perceptions of the value of riparian plantings. Farmers were invited to participated in an interactive meeting with the purpose of describing their experiences and views […]

    Read More
  • Page 1 of 13