Blog

  • What the world needs now is more swamps

    Swamps are some of the most diverse and productive ecosystems on earth, and play an important role in mitigating the impacts of climate change. At Rivers of Carbon we have been talking about swamps and wetlands as “Buffers, sponges and moderators” because they play an important role in moderating flows, preventing flooding downstream and storing water during […]

    Read More
  • Adventurous volunteering in the Upper Murrumbidgee!

    Deep in the heart of the riverine gorges of the Upper Murrumbidgee you will find beautiful rock cascades and bottle-brushes with thick trunks gripping the rocky banks, holding on to withstand the high flows that this river would once have regularly endured. These gorges have also long been the home of our iconic native fish […]

    Read More
  • What is the 4 per 1000 initiative?

    The ‘4 per 1000’ initiative is an international initiative launched in December 2015 – but still very relevant – that aims to demonstrate that agriculture and agricultural soils play a crucial role in ensuring food security and managing climate change. The ambition of the initiative is to encourage stakeholders to transition towards a productive, highly resilient agriculture, […]

    Read More
  • Workshop Recap: Engaging Stakeholders and Communicating Effectively

    When we collaborate with others, we invest in establishing strong, enduring relationships. Humans are social beings, therefore we must take time to listen, understand and appreciate the perceptions, networks and communities people are part of. It is this behaviour that builds connection and trust, and this was the foundation of our 2-day workshop last week. […]

    Read More
  • Film Launch Recap: Buffers, Sponges & Moderators

    “Buffers, sponges and moderators?” I am often greeted with a puzzled look when anyone hears the name of our new film ‘Buffers, sponges and moderators’, but after our launch last week, I am sure any confusion will be cleared up as people learn all about the buffering, sponging and moderating functions wetlands and swampy meadows […]

    Read More
  • Event Recap – Burra Erosion Community Conversation

    It was a wild, windy and wet morning as I drove out to Burra, just on the outskirts of Queanbeyan and Canberra, to setup for our Erosion Community Conversation. When I arrived at the Burra Community Association Hall I was greeted by Janelle from the Molonglo Catchment Group saying “we’ve got no power”. I am […]

    Read More
  • Freshwater turtle or tortoise in Australia? Busting the common misconception.

    Meet Toothless 😊(pictured above). Toothless is an Eastern long-necked freshwater turtle – yet, it’s quite common for people to identify Toothless as an Australian tortoise species, not a turtle. We asked our friendly turtle expert Bruno Ferronato, about this misconception and he was happy to share his knowledge with us… Fact: There are no native […]

    Read More
  • Buffers, Sponges & Moderators – a film about managing swampy meadows and wetlands

    Rivers of Carbon and South East Local Land Services would like to invite you to the launch of ‘Buffers, Sponges & Moderators: Managing swampy meadows, wetlands and chain of ponds’. Join us for an afternoon screening of the film with scones and tea provided.  You will also hear from and meet the cast! Event details: […]

    Read More
  • Aboriginal Cultural Land Management and Sustainable and Productive Rural Practice for the 21st Century

    An early evening conversation with Bill Gammage and Bruce Pascoe Facilitated by Peter Bridgewater (Chair Landcare ACT) and Ngunawal Elder Wally Bell You are invited to join Bruce, Bill, Peter and Wally in conversation on 9th May 2018, 5 – 7 pm (drinks and nibbles from 4.30pm) Where: Building 1 Room A21, University of Canberra. […]

    Read More
  • What? We have three different types of ibis in Australia?

    In the past 30 years, there have been significant declines in populations of all of our waterbirds, including the Australian ibis species. Australian scientists are hard at work studying these groups and attempting to identify the cause of the declining numbers in certain habitats. In the case of ibis, causes are thought to include reductions […]

    Read More
  • Page 1 of 16