sophievandijk, Author at Rivers of Carbon

  • Australian soils play major role in global carbon sequestration

    Australia is one of ten countries that account for 60% of the 680 billion tonnes of carbon stored in the top 30cm of soil around the world. According to a major project launched late last year by the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of the United Nations, action should be taken to protect these natural […]

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  • Wetlands five times more efficient at reducing nitrate than the best land-based conservation practices….

    We came across this interesting article that adds further weight to the value of wetlands in our agricultural and urban environments… The agricultural regions of the U.S. Midwest have a problem with excess nitrate from crop fertiliser making its way into rivers and streams through subsurface drainage channels and agricultural ditches.  High nitrate concentrations in waterways are harmful […]

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  • Stone Age to ‘drone age’: using technology for reforestation

    A team of scientists are fighting climate change by dragging reforestation technology from the Stone Age to the ‘drone age’. In November last year, scientists in Thailand sent a drone on a test mission – not to target an enemy hiding in the forest below, but to bring new life to woodlands by “bombing” them with […]

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  • Succession, Transition and Communication: Women in Grazing Initiative

    Succession and transition of an agribusiness has been identified by many research groups, banks and government bodies as being one of the major risks to Australian agriculture. This event aims to look at how agribusinesses can consider the situation and help all family members on this journey. This event is presented by South East Local […]

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  • Climate scientists unlock the secrets of blue carbon

    Results from a new analysis of 1,900 soil cores collected around the United States could bolster efforts to monitor and protect wetlands around the globe. Tidal wetlands come in many forms, but they could be more alike below the surface than anyone realised. Whether it’s a mangrove forest in Florida, a freshwater swamp in Virginia […]

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  • Rethinking our fencing focus – small streams crucially important

    New Zealand scientists are calling for a change to the current waterway fencing requirements that only require streams wider than 1 metre and deeper than 30cm to be fenced  to exclude stock. Research by Dr Richard McDowell published in the International Journal of Environmental Quality has found that smaller, exempt streams actually account for the majority […]

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  • National Carp Control Plan Community Consultation

    Residents are invited to attend a community briefing session hosted by South East Local Land Services and the National Carp Control Plan. The National Carp Control Plan (NCCP) is exploring the possible release of the carp virus, Cyprinid herpesvirus 3, as a biocontrol agent, to reduce the prevalence of carp in our waterways. This workshop […]

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  • Lack of maintenance is a major challenge for stream restoration projects

    Environmental infrastructure and practices designed to restore and protect aquatic systems are now mainstream. Yet many of these projects are failing to produce biophysical outcomes that they are designed for because of poor maintenance. The success of restoration projects is just as much a consequence of how they are maintained, as it is how the […]

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  • Putting a price tag on biodiversity

    Biodiversity in dollars and cents? Although the ecological benefits of biodiversity are well documented, those benefits have rarely been expressed in dollars and cents. A team of economists and ecologists, including University of Illinois professor of environmental economics Amy Ando, have developed one of the first models to assign a dollar value to the loss […]

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  • Five Things About Long-Term Monitoring

    Professor David Lindenmayer wrote this excellent article for  the latest edition of ‘Decision Point’, thank you to David Salt, editor of Decision Point for allowing us to share it here. Effective long-term environmental monitoring is difficult and challenging; it requires good design, careful review, long-term commitment, and often gets overlooked when resources are handed out […]

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