sophievandijk, Author at Rivers of Carbon

  • Welcome to our Yass Gorge: insight into Yass’ natural treasure

    Welcome to Our Yass Gorge by Geoff Robertson and Ryl Parker provides a terrific introduction to this special part of our region. Yass Gorge, stretching from Flat Rock Crossing to the Yass Dam wall, is a wonderful natural treasure in the middle of Yass and an ideal place to visit and learn about the geology, […]

    Read More
  • Streamside forests top the scales for carbon storage

    Restoring forests is an important strategy for climate change management, and in recent years we have seen a global effort working towards forest restoration.  The carbon storage potential of forests, particularly streamside forests, is often overlooked.  In November 2018, however, researchers released findings following an intensive compilation and analysis of carbon storage data from 117 reports, […]

    Read More
  • Encouraging research shows small habitat patches crucial to species survival

    Small, local patches of bushland and vegetation are more important than we previously thought. A global study was published in late 2018 that looked at the conservation values of vegetation patches in 27 countries, including Australia, and found that small vegetation patches play an important role in biodiversity conservation. “Compared to large and well connected habitat areas, […]

    Read More
  • What the world needs now is more swamps

    Swamps are some of the most diverse and productive ecosystems on earth, and play an important role in mitigating the impacts of climate change. At Rivers of Carbon we have been talking about swamps and wetlands as “Buffers, sponges and moderators” because they play an important role in moderating flows, preventing flooding downstream and storing water during […]

    Read More
  • What is the 4 per 1000 initiative?

    The ‘4 per 1000’ initiative is an international initiative launched in December 2015 – but still very relevant – that aims to demonstrate that agriculture and agricultural soils play a crucial role in ensuring food security and managing climate change. The ambition of the initiative is to encourage stakeholders to transition towards a productive, highly resilient agriculture, […]

    Read More
  • Australian soils play major role in global carbon sequestration

    Australia is one of ten countries that account for 60% of the 680 billion tonnes of carbon stored in the top 30cm of soil around the world. According to a major project launched late last year by the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of the United Nations, action should be taken to protect these natural […]

    Read More
  • Wetlands five times more efficient at reducing nitrate than the best land-based conservation practices….

    We came across this interesting article that adds further weight to the value of wetlands in our agricultural and urban environments… The agricultural regions of the U.S. Midwest have a problem with excess nitrate from crop fertiliser making its way into rivers and streams through subsurface drainage channels and agricultural ditches.  High nitrate concentrations in waterways are harmful […]

    Read More
  • Stone Age to ‘drone age’: using technology for reforestation

    A team of scientists are fighting climate change by dragging reforestation technology from the Stone Age to the ‘drone age’. In November last year, scientists in Thailand sent a drone on a test mission – not to target an enemy hiding in the forest below, but to bring new life to woodlands by “bombing” them with […]

    Read More
  • Climate scientists unlock the secrets of blue carbon

    Results from a new analysis of 1,900 soil cores collected around the United States could bolster efforts to monitor and protect wetlands around the globe. Tidal wetlands come in many forms, but they could be more alike below the surface than anyone realised. Whether it’s a mangrove forest in Florida, a freshwater swamp in Virginia […]

    Read More
  • Rethinking our fencing focus – small streams crucially important

    New Zealand scientists are calling for a change to the current waterway fencing requirements that only require streams wider than 1 metre and deeper than 30cm to be fenced  to exclude stock. Research by Dr Richard McDowell published in the International Journal of Environmental Quality has found that smaller, exempt streams actually account for the majority […]

    Read More
  • Page 1 of 4