sophievandijk, Author at Rivers of Carbon

  • Succession, Transition and Communication: Women in Grazing Initiative

    Succession and transition of an agribusiness has been identified by many research groups, banks and government bodies as being one of the major risks to Australian agriculture. This event aims to look at how agribusinesses can consider the situation and help all family members on this journey. This event is presented by South East Local […]

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  • Climate scientists unlock the secrets of blue carbon

    Results from a new analysis of 1,900 soil cores collected around the United States could bolster efforts to monitor and protect wetlands around the globe. Tidal wetlands come in many forms, but they could be more alike below the surface than anyone realised. Whether it’s a mangrove forest in Florida, a freshwater swamp in Virginia […]

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  • Rethinking our fencing focus – small streams crucially important

    New Zealand scientists are calling for a change to the current waterway fencing requirements that only require streams wider than 1 metre and deeper than 30cm to be fenced  to exclude stock. Research by Dr Richard McDowell published in the International Journal of Environmental Quality has found that smaller, exempt streams actually account for the majority […]

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  • National Carp Control Plan Community Consultation

    Residents are invited to attend a community briefing session hosted by South East Local Land Services and the National Carp Control Plan. The National Carp Control Plan (NCCP) is exploring the possible release of the carp virus, Cyprinid herpesvirus 3, as a biocontrol agent, to reduce the prevalence of carp in our waterways. This workshop […]

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  • Lack of maintenance is a major challenge for stream restoration projects

    Environmental infrastructure and practices designed to restore and protect aquatic systems are now mainstream. Yet many of these projects are failing to produce biophysical outcomes that they are designed for because of poor maintenance. The success of restoration projects is just as much a consequence of how they are maintained, as it is how the […]

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  • Putting a price tag on biodiversity

    Biodiversity in dollars and cents? Although the ecological benefits of biodiversity are well documented, those benefits have rarely been expressed in dollars and cents. A team of economists and ecologists, including University of Illinois professor of environmental economics Amy Ando, have developed one of the first models to assign a dollar value to the loss […]

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  • Five Things About Long-Term Monitoring

    Professor David Lindenmayer wrote this excellent article for  the latest edition of ‘Decision Point’, thank you to David Salt, editor of Decision Point for allowing us to share it here. Effective long-term environmental monitoring is difficult and challenging; it requires good design, careful review, long-term commitment, and often gets overlooked when resources are handed out […]

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  • A need for clear communication – exploring the links between extreme weather and climate change

    What are the connections to human-caused climate change? And how can we best communicate what the most recent science is telling us about human-induced and natural changes to weather and climate? There is still widespread confusion about the linkages between human-induced climate change and extreme weather, not only among the public, but also among some […]

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  • Spot the scientist! Veg surveys underway in the Murray-Darling Basin in challenging conditions

    Surveys have commenced across the Murray-Darling Basin for the Vegetation Theme in the Murray-Darling Basin Environmental Water Knowledge and Research project  (MDB EWKR). A variety of wetland and floodplain habitats are being surveyed over autumn, including woodlands, shrublands and wetlands. Wetland and floodplain plants are critical components of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, supplying energy […]

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  • Are people willing to pay for the co-benefits of carbon farming like biodiversity, vegetation and wellbeing? Find out…

    Adopting carbon farming practices can lead to a loss in profit for farmers. So, is the public willing to pay for the co-benefits of carbon farming? Researchers from the University of Western Australia have estimated the public’s ‘willingness-to-pay’ for carbon farming, and the results of this work have implications for carbon-farming policies. Carbon-farming benefits Agricultural […]

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