sophievandijk, Author at Rivers of Carbon

  • Are people willing to pay for the co-benefits of carbon farming like biodiversity, vegetation and wellbeing? Find out…

    Adopting carbon farming practices can lead to a loss in profit for farmers. So, is the public willing to pay for the co-benefits of carbon farming? Researchers from the University of Western Australia have estimated the public’s ‘willingness-to-pay’ for carbon farming, and the results of this work have implications for carbon-farming policies. Carbon-farming benefits Agricultural […]

    Read More
  • Why speak? Scientists as sifters and sorters

    In an information free-for-all why should scientists bother to add their voice? Emma Johnston argues that there is an increasingly important role for scientists amongst the growing ranks of public intellectuals. She explains that scientists must be sifters and sorters to identify what is valuable, sift out deliberately distracting stories and counter fake news. The […]

    Read More
  • What do farmers think about planting riparian margins?

    Fleur Maseyk and her team from the University of Queensland surveyed a group of  dairy farmers working on the Taranaki ring plain in New Zealand to learn more about their perceptions of the value of riparian plantings. Farmers were invited to participated in an interactive meeting with the purpose of describing their experiences and views […]

    Read More
  • Hear, see and experience the Truth about Trees…

    Harness the power of nature to increase production, profit and pleasure on your property… Would you like to make your property as healthy, productive and beautiful as it can be? Then don’t miss this free, fully catered special expo for land managers, large and small, in the Gunning and Yass districts. Whether you are contemplating […]

    Read More
  • Help to save the yellow-spotted bell frog!

    South East Local Land Services has $125,000 of NSW Office of Environment and Heritage Saving Our Species funding, available over five years, to assist land managers to undertake project works that protect and enhance yellow-spotted bell frog habitat. Senior Land Services Officer Annelies McGaw said this inconspicuous frog is one of the most endangered vertebrates […]

    Read More
  • Rivers of Hope – crayfish lead the campaign for healthy waterways

    ANU biologists are helping crayfish lead the campaign for fresher waterways along the west of Canberra.  Biologist Dr Chris Fulton and Masters student Mae Noble have spent time snorkelling in the Goobarragandra River, in the high country west of Canberra, hoping to catch a glimpse of the Murray Crayfish. Six years ago, this was an […]

    Read More
  • Murrumbidgee Photo Exhibition – 26 Days

    A new exhibition opened on Thursday last week (1st September 2016) at the Tuggeranong Arts Centre. Entitled Murrumbidgee River – 26 Days, the exhibition marks 26 days of photographing the Murrumbidgee River and its environs. The photos were taken by two Canberra teachers, Alan Lee and Jonquil Mackey, who chose to capture the river as it travels […]

    Read More
  • 2016 Riverprize Finalists Announced

    Three outstanding finalists from Spain and the United States are in the running for the 2016 Theiss International Riverprize. A big congratulations goes to the teams working in the Segura (Spain), Elwha (USA) and Niagara (USA) Rivers! The initiatives that have helped these teams reach the final stage are incredible. We thought that we would […]

    Read More
  • Are algal blooms the new norm for Australia’s major rivers?

    Are toxic algal blooms the new norm for Australian rivers? Are we really ready for them to be recurrent on the Murray River? More importantly, what do these frequent blooms say about how we manage water in Australia, especially as we start to see the impacts of climate change on our environment? For much of […]

    Read More
  • How can we manage habitat fragmentation better?

    Human altered landscapes are having a big influence on animals. As our populations grow and develop, we expand, changing habitats to the detriment of some species. In a recent article entitled How often, how far, how risky and how biased? researchers from the University of Queensland discuss some important factors to consider in the development […]

    Read More
  • Page 1 of 3