April 2017 - Rivers of Carbon

  • Are people willing to pay for the co-benefits of carbon farming like biodiversity, vegetation and wellbeing? Find out…

    Adopting carbon farming practices can lead to a loss in profit for farmers. So, is the public willing to pay for the co-benefits of carbon farming? Researchers from the University of Western Australia have estimated the public’s ‘willingness-to-pay’ for carbon farming, and the results of this work have implications for carbon-farming policies. Carbon-farming benefits Agricultural […]

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  • Why speak? Scientists as sifters and sorters

    In an information free-for-all why should scientists bother to add their voice? Emma Johnston argues that there is an increasingly important role for scientists amongst the growing ranks of public intellectuals. She explains that scientists must be sifters and sorters to identify what is valuable, sift out deliberately distracting stories and counter fake news. The […]

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  • RoC Community Conversation: Why do you want to mess it up and slow it down – Part Two

    Following such a great response to our ‘Mess it up and slow it down’ workshop in Goulburn last October, we are delighted that Margie Fitzpatrick has invited the Rivers of Carbon community to her beautiful property ‘Australind’, to see the range of ways she has ‘messed it up and slowed water down’. Along with Margie, […]

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  • Cows relaxing in the river leads to more poo….

    Temperature driven pooing: In a paper entitled ‘Temperature-driven river utilisation and preferential defecation by cattle in an English chalk stream‘  by Trevor Alan Bond, David Sear and Mary Edwards, the finding is shared that cattle standing in water ‘pooed’ five times more that the average defacation frequency.  I suspect given how hot it gets here in […]

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  • The case of the missing Ibis, a satellite tracker and some butcherbirds…..

    Heather McGinness who spoke recently at our Breadalbane Biodiversity Forum shared this great story with us about the case of the missing Ibis, a satellite tracker and some cheeky butcher birds… As part of our Environmental Water Knowledge and Research waterbird project we are satellite tracking Glossy Ibis to see where they roost, breed, feed […]

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