June 2015 - Rivers of Carbon

  • ‘Biowealth’ – a leap forward for biodiversity appreciation

    Corey Bradshaw proposes this idea called ‘biowealth’ that I came across while exploring his excellent blog conservation bytes. Here is an excerpt from his blog with the link to find out more… Let’s face it, ‘biodiversity’ is a slippery and abstract concept for most people. Hell, even most ecologists have a hard time describing what […]

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  • Do tree mixes stack up to monocultures in carbon plantings?

    The developing carbon market has created incentives to plant forests that offset carbon emissions. But what types of forests should we plant? Will monocultures of fast-growing trees like those used in the timber industry maximize carbon storage or is there another option? Our research team has been particularly eager to explore this question in relation […]

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  • Are volunteers the way of the future for effective decision-making?

    Citizen science, the involvement of volunteers from the general community in academic research, has become increasingly important in conservation science. Aided by the internet, the popularity and scope of citizen science appears almost limitless. For citizens, the motivation is to contribute to science and better conservation outcomes. For researchers, citizen science provides an opportunity to […]

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  • X-ray seed vision

    This seed x-ray isn’t just beautiful. It’s also a very useful part of the landscape restoration process. Dave Collins and Anne Smith explain why. Over the past four years we’ve been using an x-ray machine to take a closer look at the seeds we collect from wild populations and our own seed production areas in WA’s […]

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  • Is local seed always best?

    Conventional wisdom would suggest that locally collected seed is the gold standard for habitat restoration. But is local native provenance always the best option? Restoration ecologist Neil Davidson investigates. The remaining woodland in the Midlands of Tasmania is highly fragmented. Less than 10% still stands in some regions, so suitable populations for seed collection are […]

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